Pagan and the Pit(bulls)

The political musings of a Pagan and her dogs.

Sephora offers “witch kits”. Just no.

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In October, Sephora will start to sell a “Starter Witch Kit” from Pinrose. It’s a box of perfumes with tarot cards, sage, and a rose quartz, and it sells for $42 plus tax.

I’m going to put this warning right here, I love Halloween. As a Libra, I love October. As a white girl, I love pumpkin spice. But this time of year also makes me super irritable, because people turn witchcraft into a capitalist boost.

I get it, October is the perfect time to use witchcraft as a capitalist/consumerist gimmick to more people to buy your product. And thanks to irresponsible representation and claims by foolish celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, the beauty industry is incorporating mysticism and magick into its toxic portfolio. I am not ok with that.

I, like most women, do use cosmetics. I have a bag full of them, and my bathroom counter is littered with serums and eye creams. I will cut someone if they take my mucin serum. I do incorporate magick into my cosmetic routine: my clay mask has rose oil in it, and I use as part of a self-love charm/meditation. But using magick as a selling point to wealthy white women who want to dabble in the mystic arts like sneaky school girls? That’s both the beginning of The Crucible and white Christian feminism at its finest.

Witchcraft is not your marketing gimmick. It’s an art form that should be practiced with care because it can be messed up. Yes, you can (and should!) have fun with it, but sometimes a little caution is warranted.

And while this seems innocuous and “good fun”, it feeds into the cultural paranoia around witchcraft. Just yesterday, I got a link to a webcast calling Burning Man the “biggest religious festival in the US” dedicated to Moloch and witchcraft.  Two days ago I wrote about a White Evangelical Christian pastor preaching against witchcraft from the pulpit. Sermons have been going on for decades about the dangers of mainstream witchcraft. “Good fun” for non-Pagans or non-magickal practitioners can have real impacts on the rest of us.

It’s not cool to use our religion and spiritual beliefs as your sales pitch. And it’s really not cool to use it when it could have real-life implications on us.

 

 

Author: paganandthepitbull

Daughter of Hecate, dog lover, would be author, Pagan in South Korea

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